The New Music

Caccini’s Le Nuove Musiche was one of the first publications to codify the dazzling vocal ornamentation typically improvised by singers of the pre-Baroque and which paved the way for Monteverdi’s groundbreaking opera L’Orfeo. In the 20th century, Benjamin Britten turned to Renaissance poetry for inspiration for his Seven Sonnets of Michelangelo for voice and piano, setting the texts with innovative compositional techniques that still sound fresh and modern today.

Baritone Sven Edward Olbash and pianist Kevin Korth present a recital of works by these three composers as a benefit for Lacuna Arts.

 

Monday, August 28 at 7 pm (doors at 6:30) at 55 Taylor, San Francisco

 

Songs of Fire and Ice

Lacuna Arts Chorale returns to Old First Concerts for the third year in a row with another unusual and innovative holiday program, this time featuring choral works by all living composers. "In the bleak midwinter" by Abbie Betinis and "There is no rose" from Paul Mealor's Now Sleeps The Crimson Petal make a nod to the traditional Christmas narrative. Madrigals by Emma Lou Diemer and Theodore Morrison set familiar Shakespeare texts including the chilly "Blow, blow thou winter wind" and "When icicles hang by the wall" in contemporary musical arrangements while Morten Lauridsen explores the burning passion found in love poetry of the Italian Renaissance in his Madrigali: Six Fire Songs, built upon different iterations of what he calls his "fire chord." 

 

Friday, December 15 at 8 pm at 1751 Sacramento, San Francisco

 

Primavera!

Our May program is bursting with the colors of springtime and the smell of flowers fresh from the garden with choral music from Fanny Mendelssohn's Gartenlieder and Benjamin Britten's Five Flower Songs. EJ Moeran sets texts by Shakespeare in Songs of Springtime, as does Matthew Harris in his "It was a lover and his lass." The program is rounded out by madrigals and part-songs by Carlo Gesualdo and perennial Lacuna Arts favorite Heinrich von Herzogenberg.

 

Sunday, May 20 at 4 pm at 261 Fell, San Francisco